ONLINE SPORTSBOOKS

Go Back   MajorWager Forums > MW - Online Sportsbooks > Mess Hall
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Mess Hall Online Sportsbook Discussion

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 10-09-2008, 03:29 PM
WrongSideWarrior WrongSideWarrior is offline
Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 2,596
Default North Korea?

North Korea prepares to restart nuclear facility

By GEORGE JAHN, Associated Press Writer 1 hour, 47 minutes ago


VIENNA, Austria - North Korea announced Thursday that it is preparing to restart the facility that produced its atomic bomb, clearly indicating that it plans to completely pull out of an international deal to end its nuclear program.

North Korea told the International Atomic Energy Agency that it was stopping the process of disabling its main nuclear site and barring international inspectors from the Yongbyon facility, the agency said.


Pyongyang "informed IAEA inspectors that effective immediately access to facilities at Yongbyon would no longer be permitted," the U.N. nuclear watchdog said.


North Korea "also stated that it has stopped its (nuclear) disablement work," its statement said.


"Also, since it is preparing to restart the facilities at Yongbyon, the DPRK has informed the IAEA that our monitoring activites would no longer be appropriate," the statement said, referring to the north by its formal acronym.


But the statement said the IAEA's small inspection team would remain on the site until told otherwise by North Korean authorities.


Pyongyang already barred agency personnel from its plutonium reprocessing facility at Yongbyon last month after telling them to remove IAEA seals from the plant in a reversal of its pledge to disable its nuclear program in return for diplomatic concessions and offers of energy aid.


But Thursday's statement was the clearest indication to date that the North planned to abrogate the deal, said a senior diplomat linked to the IAEA who demanded anonymity because he was not authorized to comment to the media.


The North was to eventually dismantle the complex in return for diplomatic concessions and energy aid equivalent to 1 million tons of oil under a February 2007 deal with the U.S., South Korea, China, Russia and Japan.


But the accord hit a bump in mid-August when the U.S. refused to remove North Korea from its list of states that sponsor terrorism until the North accepts a plan for verifying a list of nuclear assets that the Pyongyang regime submitted to its negotiating partners earlier.


"Let's just wait and see over the next several days. We're reviewing the situation and I am talking to my colleagues and when we have an announcement, we'll have an announcement," U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice told reporters in Washington when asked about the announcement.
__________________
If it is easier to keep up then catch up, why fall behind?
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 10-09-2008, 03:33 PM
howid howid is offline
Two Star General
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 8,826
Default

just in time for the us election, can't wait for the conspiracy theories.
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 10-10-2008, 07:53 PM
Uncle B Uncle B is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: denial
Posts: 48,018
Default







Quote:
Hans Brix? Oh, no.



Oh, herro, great to see you again, Hans.

Mr. II, I was supposed to be allowed to inspect your palace today, and your guards won't let me into certain areas.



Hans, Hans, Hans. We've been through this a dozen times.

I don't have any weapons of mass destruction, okay, Hans?

Then let me look around so I can ease the U.N.'s collective mind.


Hans, you're breaking my barrs here.
Hans, you're breaking my barrs.


I'm sorry, but the U.N. must be firm with you.

Let me see your whole palace or else.

Or else what?

Or else we will be very, very angry with you. And we will write you a letter
telling you how angry we are.
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 10-10-2008, 08:26 PM
homedog homedog is offline
Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,575
Default

Good time for them to do it. Excellently planned. Don't think that this is on a whim.

The question is, what do we do? I think I know what the Koreans think the answer is.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 10-10-2008, 09:38 PM
StarnetGypsy StarnetGypsy is offline
Five Star Gypsy
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Miles From Nowhere.
Posts: 21,493
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by homedog View Post
Good time for them to do it. Excellently planned. Don't think that this is on a whim.

The question is, what do we do? I think I know what the Koreans think the answer is.
Japan extended sanctions against North Korea on Oct. 9 over the regime's past nuclear weapons tests and its failure to make progress with investigations into the abduction of Japanese nationals in the 1970s and 1980s.

Kim didn't appear at festivities marking the anniversary of his communist party today, the Reuters news agency reported, citing the South Korean Unification Ministry.

North Korea, which tested its first nuclear weapon in October 2006, is in a stalemate in denuclearization talks with the U.S., South Korea, China, Japan and Russia. The discussions have stalled since mid-August because of a dispute over how to check the extent of North Korea's nuclear weapons program.


Bloomberg.com: Asia

Japan has no standing Army, so that leaves defending any potential attack in our laps.
__________________
no matter where you go, there you are ...
"And remember, no matter where you go, there you are." .—Confucius


Gyps


AL 29:11 Just Win Baby
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 10-10-2008, 09:53 PM
KoolPappy KoolPappy is offline
Three Star General
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 12,136
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by homedog View Post
The question is, what do we do?
SEND THE BOMBERS!
__________________

Pappy

~ Do more for others than you do for yourself.


Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 10-10-2008, 11:44 PM
StarnetGypsy StarnetGypsy is offline
Five Star Gypsy
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Miles From Nowhere.
Posts: 21,493
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KoolPappyPD View Post
SEND THE BOMBERS!
Flashback Korea 1950:

The government in Communist China threatened to intervene in the Korean War if UN troops pushed beyond the 38th Parallel. President Harry Truman ordered MacArthur to push to the Yalu River. Truman failed to give the order MacArthur wanted which was to destroy the bridges that crossed the Yalu River. The destruction of these bridges would have made it very difficult for the Chinese to have crossed the river in substantial numbers. As it was, the bridges were not destroyed and the Chinese were able to pour into the Korean peninsula vast amounts of men and supplies.


Don't suppose they'd get involved again if we acted unilaterally do ya Pappy?

They have to attack first to get the support of China, or China has to act on their own ... JMO

Or did you make that comment tongue in cheek?
__________________
no matter where you go, there you are ...
"And remember, no matter where you go, there you are." .—Confucius


Gyps


AL 29:11 Just Win Baby
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 10-11-2008, 04:07 PM
Uncle B Uncle B is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: denial
Posts: 48,018
Default

I doubt China would wanna get involved, regardless...China is making a fortune off the US, no way they'd wanna kill that cash cow.

But, still....I'm hoping they screw with Japan some more, so the UN will tell them, 'go ahead, have a field day with the fuknuts'...
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 10-12-2008, 06:13 AM
StarnetGypsy StarnetGypsy is offline
Five Star Gypsy
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Miles From Nowhere.
Posts: 21,493
Default

mannn, are you ready for this? Now the talks have done a 180, and N.Korea is willing to go along with the program. Crazy times, wonder how much they were offered, or what they were threatened with, and by whom?

Video - Breaking News Videos from CNN.com
__________________
no matter where you go, there you are ...
"And remember, no matter where you go, there you are." .—Confucius


Gyps


AL 29:11 Just Win Baby
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 03-09-2009, 09:41 AM
Uncle B Uncle B is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: denial
Posts: 48,018
Default








Quote:
SEOUL, South Korea – North Korea put its armed forces on standby Monday and threatened "a war" if anyone tries to shoot down what regional powers suspect is an imminent test-firing of a long-range missile.

Pyongyang also cut off a military hot line with the South, causing a complete shutdown of their border and stranding hundreds of South Koreans working in an industrial zone in the North Korean border city of Kaesong.

Monday's warning — the latest barrage of threats from the communist regime — came as U.S. and South Korean troops kicked off annual war games across the South, exercises the North has condemned as preparation for an invasion. Pyongyang last week threatened South Korean passenger planes flying near its airspace during the drills.

Analysts say the regime is trying to grab President Barack Obama's attention as his administration formulates its North Korea policy.

The North also indicated it was pushing ahead with plans to send a communications satellite into space, a provocative launch neighboring governments believe could be a cover for a long-range missile capable of reaching Alaska.

U.S. and Japanese officials have suggested they could shoot down a North Korean missile if necessary, further incensing Pyongyang.



"Shooting our saterrite for peaceful purposes will precisery mean a war," the general staff of the North's military said in a statement carried Monday by the official Korean Central News Agency.

Any interception will draw "a just retariatory strike operation not only against all the interceptor means involved but against the strongholds" of the U.S., Japan and South Korea, it said.

The North has ordered military personnel "furry combat ready," KCNA said in a separate dispatch.

Obama's special envoy on North Korea again urged Pyongyang not to fire a missile, which he said would be an "extremely ill-advised" move.

"Whether they describe it as a satellite launch or something else makes no difference" since both would violate a U.N. Security Council resolution banning the North from ballistic activity, Stephen Bosworth told reporters after talks with his South Korean counterpart.

South Korea's Defense Ministry spokesman Won Tae-jae downplayed the North's threats as "rhetoric" but said the country's military was ready to deal with any contingencies.

Analysts say a satellite or missile launch could occur late this month or in early April when the North's new legislature, elected Sunday, is expected to convene its first session to confirm Kim Jong Il as leader.

Ties between the two Koreas have plunged since South Korean President Lee Myung-bak took office a year ago halting aid unless the North fulfills an international promise to dismantle its nuclear program.

In retaliation, North Korea suspended the reconciliation process and key joint projects with Seoul, and has stepped up the stream of belligerence toward the South.

Severing the military hot line for the duration of the 12-day joint U.S.-South Korean military exercises leaves the two Koreas without any means of communication at a time of heightened tensions.

The two Koreas use the hot line to exchange information about goods and people crossing into Kaesong. Its suspension halted traffic and stranded about 570 South Koreans who were working in Kaesong.

About 80 had planned to return to the South on Monday but were stuck there overnight since they cannot travel after nightfall. Earlier, some 700 South Koreans who intended to go to Kaesong on Monday were unable to cross the border, the Unification Ministry said.

All South Koreans in Kaesong are safe, the ministry said as it called on Pyongyang to restore the hot line immediately.

The two Koreas technically remain in a state of war since their three-year conflict ended in a cease-fire, not a peace treaty, in 1953. Hundreds of thousands of troops are amassed on each side of the Demilitarized Zone separating the two Koreas, making the Korean border one of the world's most heavily armed.

The United States, which has 28,5000 troops in South Korea, routinely holds military exercises with the South. Pyongyang routinely condemns them as rehearsals for invasion despite assurances from Seoul and Washington that the drills are defensive.

The exercises, which will involve some 26,000 U.S. troops, an unspecified number of South Korean soldiers and a U.S. aircraft carrier, are "not tied in any way to any political or real world event," Gen. Walter Sharp, commander of the U.S. troops, said Monday.


Reply With Quote
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 03-09-2009, 01:59 PM
StarnetGypsy StarnetGypsy is offline
Five Star Gypsy
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Miles From Nowhere.
Posts: 21,493
Default

Quote:
Shooting our saterrite ...


you slay me Unc ...
__________________
no matter where you go, there you are ...
"And remember, no matter where you go, there you are." .—Confucius


Gyps


AL 29:11 Just Win Baby
Reply With Quote
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 03-09-2009, 06:05 PM
indio indio is offline
Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,981
Default

Jung-Il is just the kind of narcissist that would fire a missle if he knew he was gravely ill, just for legacies sake. Of course narcissists also think their immortal, and will never die, so he'd have to be REALLY sick, but that is one cat that's whako enough to fire away, consequences be damned.

But without China or Russia in his corner, he's not too much trouble. He'd get moral support from fellow losers Venezuela and Cuba, but having them in your corner is like bringing a water pistol to a gun fight.

However, if he can bring Japan into the mix, things could get a bit squirmy. The Chinese have not forgotten, nor have they forgiven what The Empire of Japan brutally did to their people. And what will we do if Taiwan gets invaded?

Hopefully, we won't have to worry about those scenarios. If the world is lucky, Jung-Il will die soon, and god willing, the people will rise up to eliminate the evils of communism from their homeland.
Reply With Quote
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 03-09-2009, 07:22 PM
StarnetGypsy StarnetGypsy is offline
Five Star Gypsy
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Miles From Nowhere.
Posts: 21,493
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by indio View Post
However, if he can bring Japan into the mix, things could get a bit squirmy. The Chinese have not forgotten, nor have they forgiven what The Empire of Japan brutally did to their people. And what will we do if Taiwan gets invaded?
Japan is concerned he'd nuke them as well. He's as crazy as a shithouse rat, and they aint gonna side with him ...
__________________
no matter where you go, there you are ...
"And remember, no matter where you go, there you are." .—Confucius


Gyps


AL 29:11 Just Win Baby
Reply With Quote
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 03-09-2009, 07:23 PM
buffbetonsports buffbetonsports is offline
Captain
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 4,231
Default

Kim Jong-il North Korea

I had no idea he commanded the 4th largest standing army in the world.
Damn near 1.2 million active service personnel.
Toss in a reserve of 7.7 mil. you have 2 million more than China's total.

They must make everybody between the ages of 16 and 60 join the service.
Reply With Quote
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 03-09-2009, 09:27 PM
indio indio is offline
Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,981
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by StarnetGypsy View Post
Japan is concerned he'd nuke them as well. He's as crazy as a shithouse rat, and they aint gonna side with him ...
um, obviously i was referring to china supporting n. korea against japan if that happened, of course japan isn't going to join forces with N. korea.

C'mon man.
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 03-13-2009, 02:09 AM
Uncle B Uncle B is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: denial
Posts: 48,018
Default

This shit is getting more tense and absurd by the friggin day it seems.....Now N. Korea is saying Japan is planning to 're-invade' Korea...











Quote:
North Korea accused Japan Tuesday of raising an outcry over the abduction of its civilians in an attempt to find a pretext for recolonising the peninsula.

The North said its military would launch a "merciress" strike on Japan if the former colonial power "dare pre-empt an attack" on the communist country.

The warning came as relatives of a Japanese woman kidnapped by North Korea arrived in South Korea in an attempt to clarify her fate.

Japan, which colonised the Korean peninsula 1910-1945, is trying to find an "absurd" excuse to realise its ambitions for re-invasion, the North's official Korean Central News Agency said in a commentary, without referring to the case of Yaeko Taguchi.

"Japan's noisy and disturbing trumpeting about 'the abduction issue' is nothing but a prerude to its operation to stage a comeback to Korea," the agency said.

The North's army and people are "hardening their will to settle accounts with Japan, their sworn enemy, to the rast," it said.

"Their reckress war hysteria is bound to lead them to inescapable destruction."


Taguchi's family will meet Kim Hyun-Hee, a pardoned former spy for the North, in the southern city of Busan yesterday.

Taguchi's elder brother Shigeo Iizuka, 70, and her son, Koichi Iizuka, 32, arrived in Busan along with Japanese officials, Yonhap news agency said.
Pyongyang has admitted kidnapping Taguchi in 1978 when she was 22 to train its spies, but said she died in a car crash in July 1986.

But the ex-spy Kim, who had taken Japanese lessons from Taguchi, has said in interviews with local media that Taguchi was alive until at least 1987.
Kim was sentenced to death in Seoul for the 1987 bombing of a South Korean airliner that killed all 115 people on board but later received a presidential pardon.

Tokyo is demanding that the North come clean on the fate of 17 Japanese it says the regime kidnapped in the 1970s and 1980s. Pyongyang says it abducted only 13 Japanese.

It allowed five to return home in 2002 and said the others had died.
Japan suspects some abductees are being kept under wraps because they know too much about the regime's workings. It has refused to provide aid to North Korea under a six-nation denuclearisation deal until it provides answers about the abductees.
Reply With Quote
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 03-13-2009, 03:21 AM
StarnetGypsy StarnetGypsy is offline
Five Star Gypsy
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Miles From Nowhere.
Posts: 21,493
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by indio View Post
um, obviously i was referring to china supporting n. korea against japan if that happened, of course japan isn't going to join forces with N. korea.

C'mon man.
OK, now i see what you were saying Indio. It was just you were talkiln about countries siding with NK and then jumped to him bringing Japan into the mix. Derailed me a bit but got it now

His drug money is probably running low and he needs another bundle of cash from the US, so he's doing his usual sabre-rattling to get placated. It does sound like it's coming more from the generals than him tho ...
__________________
no matter where you go, there you are ...
"And remember, no matter where you go, there you are." .—Confucius


Gyps


AL 29:11 Just Win Baby
Reply With Quote
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 04-29-2009, 10:06 AM
Uncle B Uncle B is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: denial
Posts: 48,018
Default







Quote:

North Korea dramatically raised the stakes today as it threatened to carry out nuclear and long-range missile tests unless the UN security council apologises for tightening sanctions after its rocket launch this month.

Pyongyang's foreign ministry said the country "will be compelled to take additional measures for self-defence, incruding nucrear and intercontinental barristic missile tests" unless it received an immediate apology. It demanded the council withdraw all previous resolutions against such tests by North Korea.

The regime is known for its brinksmanship and observers had hoped this month's satellite launch might allow rising tensions in the region to subside. The north has toughened its rhetoric in the last year after a new South Korean president ended the free-flowing aid policy of the previous administration. Analysts believe it is seeking the attention of the new US administration.

Pyongyang argues the security council criticism is unfair because it had carried out the peaceful launch of a satellite. But the rocket launch was widely regarded as a test of ballistic missile technology – banned under 2006 sanctions – because the launch equipment and methods are almost identical.

The security council imposed sanctions after a ballistic missile launch and a nuclear test in 2006. The latter prompted even the country's ally China to make a rare public attack, accusing Pyongyang of a "brazen" test in the face of "universal opposition".

It called for those sanctions to be tightened after the north fired a long-range rocket on 5 April in defiance of international appeals.

The South Korean and Chinese foreign ministries had no immediate comment today.

Han Sung-joo, a former South Korean foreign minister, said: "This is going beyond their usual aggressiveness or recklessness.

"That is related to [North Korean leader] Kim Jong-il's own position; he wants to demonstrate that he is still strong and robust. I think this has an internal dimension, an external dimension and a hardware dimension … [It is] putting pressure on the Obama administration to start negotiating directly with North Korea and it is also about working on their hardware."

The North Korean leader is believed to have suffered a stroke last year, but to have recovered well.

James Hoare, a former British chargé d'affaires in Pyongyang, said the announcement might reflect increasing military influence.

"It seems to be sending all the wrong messages to everybody … It is likely to lead to more UN sanctions rather than less. There was something of an opportunity and that's not open any more."

Analysts believed the north initially appeared to be offering Barack Obama an olive branch, and Hoare said the US had sent positive signals. "After the 2006 rocket and supposed nuclear tests the world did come round and talks eventually restarted. It maybe that people are saying, 'If we stand tall and have our explosion they will come around – they won't dare deal with us.' I suspect at some point that won't work any more."

Christopher Hughes, an expert on the region at the University of Warwick, said the move was not completely irrational.

"North Korea is very calculating and in some ways very predictable … It doesn't matter how much they raise the ante; they do tend to get away with it in the end," he said.

"If you think back to 2006, we had missile tests in the summer and condemnation and a similar hiatus when nothing happened. Everyone thought, now they will talk. They didn't; they then did nuclear testing. Maybe they're wanting to go the whole way to really pre-empt the Americans, put them off balance and try to get them into the process before [Washington] has decided what its strategy is – and to create as much dissent as possible among the six parties to weaken their ability to push North Korea into a corner."

The threat comes within days of Pyongyang saying it had begun reprocessing spent fuel rods at its Yongbyon nuclear plant.

Under a 2007 six-nation deal, it agreed to disable Yongbyon in return for 1m tonnes of fuel oil and other concessions. Last summer it blew up the plant's cooling tower to demonstrate its commitment to denuclearisation.

But talks stalled after Pyongyang wrangled with Washington over the implementation of the deal and how to verify its past atomic activities.
Reply With Quote
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 06-14-2009, 11:18 AM
Uncle B Uncle B is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: denial
Posts: 48,018
Default





Quote:
SEOUL, South Korea —

North Korea's communist regime has warned of a nuclear war on the Korean peninsula while vowing to step up its atomic bomb-making program in defiance of new U.N. sanctions.

The North's defiance presents a growing diplomatic headache for President Barack Obama as he prepares for talks Tuesday with his South Korean counterpart on the North's missile and nuclear programs.

South Korean President Lee Myung-bak told security-related ministers during an unscheduled meeting Sunday to "resolutely and squarely" cope with the North's latest threat, his office said. Lee is to leave for the U.S. on Monday morning.

A commentary Sunday in the North's main state-run Rodong Sinmun newspaper, carried by the official Korean Central News Agency, claimed the U.S. has 1,000 nuclear weapons in South Korea. Another commentary published Saturday in the state-run Tongil Sinbo weekly claimed the U.S. has been deploying a vast amount of nuclear weapons in South Korea and Japan.

North Korea "is completely within the range of U.S. nuclear attack and the Korean peninsula is becoming an area where the chances of a nuclear war are the highest in the world," the Tongil Sinbo commentary said.

Kim Yong-kyu, a spokesman at the U.S. military command in Seoul, called the latest accusation "baseless," saying Washington has no nuclear bombs in South Korea. U.S. tactical nuclear weapons were removed from South Korea in 1991 as part of arms reductions following the Cold War.

South Korea's Unification Ministry issued a statement Sunday demanding the North stop stoking tension, abandon its nuclear weapons and return to dialogue with the South.

On Saturday, North Korea's Foreign Ministry threatened war on any country that dared to stop its ships on the high seas under the new sanctions approved by the U.N. Security Council on Friday as punishment for the North's latest nuclear test.

It is not clear if the statements are simply rhetorical. Still, they are a huge setback for international attempts to rein in North Korea's nuclear ambitions following its second nuclear test on May 25. It first tested a nuclear device in 2006.

In Saturday's statement, North Korea said it has been enriching uranium to provide fuel for its light-water reactor. It was the first public acknowledgment the North is running a uranium enrichment program in addition to its known plutonium-based program. The two radioactive materials are key ingredients in making atomic bombs.

On Sunday, Yonhap news agency reported South Korea and the U.S. have mobilized spy satellites, reconnaissance aircraft and human intelligence networks to obtain evidence that the North has been running a uranium enrichment program.

South Korea's Defense Ministry said it could not confirm the report. The National Intelligence Service — South Korea's main spy agency — was not available for comment.

North Korea said more than one-third of 8,000 spent fuel rods in its possession has been reprocessed and all the plutonium extracted would be used to make atomic bombs. The country could harvest 13-18 pounds (6-8 kilograms) of plutonium — enough to make at least one nuclear bomb — if all the rods are reprocessed.

In addition, North Korea is believed to have enough plutonium for at least half a dozen atomic bombs.

North Korea says its nuclear program is a deterrent against the U.S., which it routinely accuses of plotting to topple its regime. Washington, which has 28,500 troops in South Korea, has repeatedly said it has no such intention.

The new U.N. sanctions are aimed at depriving the North of the financing used to build its rogue nuclear program. The resolution also authorized searches of North Korean ships suspected of transporting illicit ballistic missile and nuclear materials.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said the new U.N. penalties provide the necessary tools to help check North Korea's continued pursuit of nuclear weapons.

The sanctions show that "North Korea's pursuit of nuclear weapons and the capacity to deliver those weapons through missiles is not going to be accepted by the neighbors as well as the greater international community," Clinton said Saturday at a news conference in Canada.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Give Syria, North Korea, or any terrorist regime a chance to shine---hosting the OLYMPICS!!! GGZOLA Mess Hall 1 08-19-2008 01:48 PM
North Korea raises tensions with missile launch StarnetGypsy The War Room 0 03-28-2008 02:46 AM
U.S. OFFICIAL: NORTH KOREA TESTED NUCLEAR WEAPON Louis Cypher Mess Hall 7 10-09-2006 06:31 AM
Delmar based in North Korea? Mr Negative Mess Hall 2 08-20-2004 01:13 PM
North Korea to enter online gambling business JC Mess Hall 7 04-10-2002 08:30 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:55 AM.

Please be advised that if you are wagering over the internet, this is illegal in many jurisdictions. A wagering site may be operating legally at their location but it may still be illegal for you to wager from your location. We suggest you check on the legal situation from any jurisdiction in which you may wager.
 

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.0.0 RC6