ONLINE SPORTSBOOKS

Go Back   MajorWager Forums > MW - Online Sportsbooks > Mess Hall
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Mess Hall Online Sportsbook Discussion

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 07-03-2007, 12:35 PM
Rogthedodger Rogthedodger is offline
Editor-in-Chief, MajorWager.com
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 6,871
Default Engaging In Dialog Difficult, When Only One Side Sees A Need - The US vs. WTO...By N. Lardner

Encountering frustration at every turn (especially in the wake of the underhanded passage of last fall's UIGEA), little Antigua, its chief domestic industry -- offshore bookmaking -- ravaged by a series of United States policymaking decisions, made a threatening gesture: consideration of dropping recognition of intellectual-property protections.

The recent pattern of United States' actions yields an unadulterated view of the United States' prevailing protectionism-first attitude, with the thoroughbred-racing industry currently occupying center-stage as Exhibit A.

A letter published in Sunday's Daily Racing Form, signed by Peggy Hendershot, the National Thoroughbred Racing Association's vice-president for legislative affairs, provides a crystal-clear look at flat racing's precise attitude towards the current landscape.

And we quote:

"Last week, Antigua threatened to withdraw its protections for intellectual property in retaliation for the loss of access to the U. S. gaming market in the long-running World Trade Organization dispute.

"Those threats notwithstanding, the situation is far from dire.

"The U. S. government remains on track to remove the WTO from the determination of who has access to U. S. pari-mutuel horse racing activity. The process of removing the United States' gaming commitments, which the U. S. government initiated earlier this year, is likely to conclude by early 2008. At that point, the U.S. government will no longer be obligated to provide market access to foreign gaming services suppliers. The question will once again be solely the province of U.S. federal and state law. Antigua's threats will not affect that outcome.

"Antigua's threats for authorization to retaliate in the amount of $3.4 billion, reportedly against U. S. intellectual property rights, will be subject to review by arbitrators who would reject the request once the United States completes the withdrawl of its market access commitments. At that point, the value of Antigua's rights arising from the dispute it initiated in 2003 would be zero.

"If the Unites States seeks to compensate the European Union (and other WTO members) for the withdrawl of commitments on gambling services covered by the WTO's General Agreement on Trade in Services, it would do so by offering market access in other service sectors, not gambling.

"The National Thoroughbred Racing Association fully supports the United States' Decision to withdraw its gaming commitments and have long advocated this action."

Talk about smug! If an open letter could be said to strut, this missive fills the bill. It's amazing how cocky one can get with enough friends in high places, greased by a number of hefty, carefully calculated contributions to key politicians.

Now, more and more of us know just how Jay Cohen felt, when . . . even after having every rational reading of the prevailing law on his side . . . JC caught a judge whose mind was apparently made up, going in. Seeing more and more of that kind of thing, these days, alas . . . with deals all wrapped up, to suit contributors' and cronys' interests, and what are YOU going to do about it, little man?

On the heels of the NETeller verdict which came down against co-founder Stephen Lawrence, all this gets more and more difficult to comprehend, when viewed from any other perspective. The widely-disseminated quote attributed to Lawrence on the heels of the decision speaks volumes:

"I came to understand that providing payment services to online gambling Web sites serving customers in the United States was wrong."

Many lawyers might take exception to that statement, so long as the subject had kept himself away from the United States and/or any of its territories - which includes the Virgin Islands, where Lawrence was finally picked up by U. S. authorities.

If Lawrence had steered clear from any land-based entity under U. S. control, don't believe he's ever picked up - and he never needs to enunciate the above statement -- which only makes sense if you're caught on United States soil on the heels of a history of engaging in the providing of a NETeller-like service.

Lawrence having to "give", to the extent he did, is a terrible harbinger for many other dominoes yet to settle into their final resting places. The good old days of 2005 are almost certainly gone for the foreseeable future, while we're left to see just how many expensive hoops will be established for those still desirous of playing some of our favorite games online.

Citizens wishing to obey the laws of the land are hoping for some cost-efficient options to be presented. Other than patronizing outlets previously established under the auspices of the long-established customary laws of the marketplace . . . those hopefuls may need endure a long wait. We'll see.

07-03-07
Nelson Lardner
MajorWager.com
lardner@majorwager.com

http://www.majorwager.com/frontline-526.html
__________________
Editor-in-Chief
MajorWager.com
editor@majorwager.com
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 07-03-2007, 12:54 PM
Uncle B Uncle B is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: denial
Posts: 48,018
Default

Quote:
"Last week, Antigua threatened to withdraw its protections for intellectual property in retaliation for the loss of access to the U. S. gaming market in the long-running World Trade Organization dispute.

"Those threats notwithstanding, the situation is far from dire.

"The U. S. government remains on track to remove the WTO from the determination of who has access to U. S. pari-mutuel horse racing activity. The process of removing the United States' gaming commitments, which the U. S. government initiated earlier this year, is likely to conclude by early 2008. At that point, the U.S. government will no longer be obligated to provide market access to foreign gaming services suppliers. The question will once again be solely the province of U.S. federal and state law. Antigua's threats will not affect that outcome.

"Antigua's threats for authorization to retaliate in the amount of $3.4 billion, reportedly against U. S. intellectual property rights, will be subject to review by arbitrators who would reject the request once the United States completes the withdrawl of its market access commitments. At that point, the value of Antigua's rights arising from the dispute it initiated in 2003 would be zero.

"If the Unites States seeks to compensate the European Union (and other WTO members) for the withdrawl of commitments on gambling services covered by the WTO's General Agreement on Trade in Services, it would do so by offering market access in other service sectors, not gambling.

"The National Thoroughbred Racing Association fully supports the United States' Decision to withdraw its gaming commitments and have long advocated this action."

that sort of attitude is a big reason why nearly every other country in the world now hates the US..
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 07-04-2007, 10:59 AM
Mr Memory Mr Memory is offline
MW Writer, Nelson Lardner
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 3,332
Default

Will have more, Thursday, regaring another recent development in what is devolving into a very ugly, regressive picture . . .
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 07-04-2007, 11:15 AM
Caitlyn Cwissy Caitlyn Cwissy is offline
Four Paw General
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 37,394
Default

I despise horse racing. Talk about hardcore gambling. That is the only reason it exists. 100% gambling. The fact lawmakers protect horse betting but ban sports betting and online gambling outrages me. These Buck Swope horse degenerates can bet all they want on the horses. The rest of us have to fuk around at grocery stores sending moneygrams to fake Princes in Antigua just to get down on Tigertown every Freaky Friday.
__________________
Cwissy
As gamblers we must understand that there is no such thing as too big to fail. It is bettor to lose it all than win some of it.
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 07-04-2007, 11:27 AM
Uncle B Uncle B is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: denial
Posts: 48,018
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Memory View Post
Will have more, Thursday, regaring another recent development in what is devolving into a very ugly, regressive picture . . .


Looking forward to it..
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 07-04-2007, 11:35 AM
Mr Memory Mr Memory is offline
MW Writer, Nelson Lardner
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 3,332
Default

I like horse racing a good deal . . . GOOD horse racing . . . Saratoga / Churchill / Del Mar-type horse racing. If you're into it, and have a sense of the history of it, it's socially unsurpassed. Second and third-rate (Philadelphia Park / Suffolk Downs) style horse racing, I have no need for. Good horse racing can stand on its own. Inferior horse racing isn't deserving of legislative help.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
english must be a difficult language Myron Mess Hall 14 02-09-2007 11:59 PM
Too Difficult Finding Mods E-Mails Here jjgold Mess Hall 6 02-14-2006 12:27 AM
Study: Boxing most difficult! Oddessa Mess Hall 3 06-07-2004 11:10 PM
Throwing A Football 65 Yards In The Air Is Not That Difficult If.... jjgold Mess Hall 12 05-30-2004 09:01 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:28 AM.

Please be advised that if you are wagering over the internet, this is illegal in many jurisdictions. A wagering site may be operating legally at their location but it may still be illegal for you to wager from your location. We suggest you check on the legal situation from any jurisdiction in which you may wager.
 

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.0.0 RC6