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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2004, 02:17 PM
alysheba88 alysheba88 is offline
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Default US Open should be great

Lot of name players playing well right now. Going on the Saturday. Beautiful course.
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Old 06-09-2004, 02:57 PM
BuzzRavanaugh BuzzRavanaugh is offline
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Default RE:US Open should be great

Leave early. Isn't the traffic a nightmare getting out there.

I will start a U.S. Open thread - I think some of these young guys could factor this year.

I still can't believe Corey Pavin won at Shinnecock.
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Buzz, I dont go to games. I buy all the Directv packages and watch them from the comfort of my own home! I dont like listening to all the fans nonsense at games! I pay for blonde women to come over and have sex with my hispanic hottie maid, and sometimes I get involved to make it a threesome! I like to lay in my pool during the day sipping on drinks that have umbrellas!

Luke M
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Old 06-09-2004, 04:16 PM
alysheba88 alysheba88 is offline
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Default RE:US Open should be great

Buzz, staying over with some inlaws out on the Island and taking the train from there. Want no part of driving. Really looking forward to it. It was this or the Belmont and I went with this (which looks like a great move now). Going to go to the PGA next year at Baltusrol. Not far from where I live. Was fortunate enough to play that course once and saw the US Womens Open there.

Got a course layout of Shinnecock it just looks tremendous
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Old 06-09-2004, 05:53 PM
BuzzRavanaugh BuzzRavanaugh is offline
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Default RE:US Open should be great

Absolutely terrific layout. Long and tough and when the wind blows its impossible. Around the greens you gotta hit some great shots.

They have tried to host the Ryder Cup out there for a couple of years but the PGA thinks it might be too tough.
__________________
Buzz, I dont go to games. I buy all the Directv packages and watch them from the comfort of my own home! I dont like listening to all the fans nonsense at games! I pay for blonde women to come over and have sex with my hispanic hottie maid, and sometimes I get involved to make it a threesome! I like to lay in my pool during the day sipping on drinks that have umbrellas!

Luke M
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Old 06-13-2004, 02:21 PM
RackMan RackMan is offline
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Default RE:US Open should be great

I can't wait either!!!!!!!!!! FYI: TUES Night on The Golf Channel is their US Open preview.

-----------------------------------------------
By Kraig Kann: The Golf Channel

This U.S. Open is a Time to Reflect
June 11, 2004
I can’t wait to hop on the plane! I can’t wait to get off the plane. I can’t wait to get to Shinnecock Hills Golf Club. I can’t wait to do our first show – Live From the U.S. Open on Tuesday night.

For me, though, this year’s U.S. Open will be about much more than just the winner. And here’s why:

In 1995, The Golf Channel debuted on January 17th. That year Ben Crenshaw won the Masters – I was there. And that year, our national championship visited Long Island’s famed Shinnecock Hills for just the third time in history. I was there too.

The fact that Shinnecock has hardly been used to crown a U.S. Open winner is, by itself, a hard fact to swallow. Shinnecock is beautiful. Shinnecock is awesome.

But there was more. For those of us at TGC who went along for the ride, the very fact that we were present and accounted for at Shinnecock and the U.S. Open was a fairytale story. And to say the least, it was an awesome experience.

Businessman Joe Gibbs had a vision. He enlisted help and a magic touch from golf’s living legend, Arnold Palmer. Together, they drummed up business at The Golf Channel and it was a cast of many (myself included) who had the responsibility and good opportunity to make it work.

Our job was large and many times overwhelming in those days. The idea of a 24-hour channel devoted to the greatest game and truest sport of them all was brilliant, yet risky. We all knew it. And no matter where we came from, we knew the reward could be larger than the risk.

Then a sportscaster at West Michigan CBS affiliate WWMT-TV, I’ll never forget the words from my news director in Michigan when I first announced my decision to head for a career in golf television.

“The Gulf Channel?” he said. “What’s that?” I said, “No, the Golf Channel, not Gulf Channel. It’s in Orlando.”

He wished me well, pledged his support, and no doubt shook his head.

Now, nearly 10 years later, the doubters are in disbelief. Early this year, the Golf Channel launched in the United Kingdom, and now has gone where I never dreamed possible – worldwide!

Thinking back to 1995 once again, I remember Tiger Woods making his amateur trip to Shinnecock Hills. I remember Greg Norman contending. And I remember Corey Pavin’s great shot and memorable win.

What you need to know is that we (TGC) were finding our way. We didn’t have relationships with players. We didn’t have the trust of golf’s biggest organizations (USGA) and we certainly didn’t have a solid place in line with media members who’d covered the sport for so long. Add to that the fact that we didn’t boast many viewers, or have a right to brag about any loyal following, and many times we wondered if what we we’re doing would ever find its niche.

The purpose of this week’s column is not to chase down accolades for what we have done. It is to let you know that returning to Shinnecock will bring many of us, who’ve been at TGC since its inception, back to our roots in this game.

This time around, Corey Pavin will know us. Tiger will respect us. The USGA will provide us with the proper access. And the assembled media will understand that we’re in this together.

It should be emphasized that there’s absolutely NO WAY we’d be headed back to Shinnecock for another U.S. Open without the help of two critical partners:


The players – who have learned in the 10 years that we are out to promote and report on who they are and what they do.


The viewers – who’ve been loyal, and supportive. And also fairly critical, which has been hugely beneficial in our growth.

So I leave you with this – not a prediction on who will win the 2004 U.S. Open as that will come next week during our live shows – but instead, a few words of thanks.

Thanks to Joe Gibbs, thanks to Arnold Palmer. Thanks to the players. Thanks to the viewers. And thanks to my wife Kimberly, too, who gave me her blessing 10 years ago to take this great job at The Gulf… er’… Golf Channel. Golf’s home has been a road well worth traveling. And I’m really proud for the chance to be a part of another U.S. Open at Shinnecock.

Email your thoughts to Kraig Kann

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Old 06-14-2004, 02:10 PM
RackMan RackMan is offline
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Default RE:US Open should be great

More Butch
-----------------------------



AFTER BUTCH, TIGER HAS BEEN TOOTHLESS

By MIKE VACCARO

June 14, 2004 --

HE will arrive at Shinnecock Hills this morning just after the sun does, making his way to the practice tee, where he will set up the most celebrated classroom in golf. Adam Scott will be first on the docket, around 7:30 or so. Tom Kite and Nick Faldo will be the last ones, sometime late in the afternoon, early in the evening.

So there's no need to worry about Butch Harmon, the most famous teacher in all of golf, and one of the most successful ever. He'll be plenty busy this week, tracking all nine of his students at the U.S. Open. Darren Clarke is one of them. So is Thomas Bjorn. He'll spend some time with Justin Leonard. Steve Flesch, too.

Of course, there is one notably absent pupil. And wherever Harmon goes, that's the one everyone wants to talk about. The one who ventured out on his own. His name is Tiger Woods. Perhaps you've heard of him.

"There is no question Tiger is still the best golfer in the world," Harmon said yesterday, in the middle of a full day at Chelsea Piers, where he was pitching the "Right Grip" gloves that bear his name.

"To me," he added, "there is also no question that if he can keep his ball in the fairway at Shinnecock this week, he can win the U.S. Open."



Here is where Harmon smiled a thin but telling smile. "If," he repeated, with feeling, "he can keep his ball in the fairway."

Harmon insists he takes no satisfaction, subtle or otherwise, from the adventures Woods had undergone since terminating their professional relationship nearly two years ago.

The last time Woods won a major was also on Long Island, two summers ago, when he electrified the grounds at Bethpage Black, a golfing deity conquering the common man's pasture. It wasn't long thereafter that the pair parted ways.

Both men continue to thrive; Harmon's client base is as strong as ever, his annual income climbing well above seven figures. Woods, despite a majors drought that now sits at seven, remains, as Harmon says, "an astonishing talent," and retains his No. 1 world ranking.

They have done well on their own. John Lennon and Paul McCartney did well on their own, too. But neither ever came up with "Abbey Road" on his own.

"Look," he said. "The truth is, I didn't want to go from tournament to tournament and be available to Tiger Woods at every moment any more. I did that for 10 years, and it was a terrific experience. Now, I have the chance to work with a number of other great players."

Still, the connection persists. A few months ago, before the Masters, Harmon received a phone call from Phil Mickelson, a friend for many years who would never have been a good Harmon student because, in Harmon's words, "I've always told him he needed to hit the ball 10 or 15 yards less off the tee, be smarter, and until lately he never wanted to hear that."

When Mickelson called, his voice was full of excitement. Harmon knew why. Mickelson's game was clicking. He could feel something potentially wonderful brewing for Augusta National. And felt, in his bones, that there was only one man who could vaporize his confidence.

"Listen," Mickelson told Harmon, "if you get any calls on your cell phone with an Orlando area code [Tiger's home turf], do me a favor. Don't answer them."

A few weeks later, during a practice round at Augusta before the tournament, Mickelson spotted Harmon and greeted him with a big smile.

"I've been watching," Mickelson said, giggling. "He never called you."

He still hasn't. And the world keeps waiting.

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