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Old 03-17-2001, 05:52 PM
heath heath is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2000
Posts: 981
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Grandfather,

Great post.

Netting those 20 games a year is the toughest thing in the world.

I think McCune mentioned once that Painter's NBA methods were quickly adopted into the betting line when he published them -- as I'm sure happens with any sort of statistical approach that works.

You also said:
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:[/size]<HR>I agree that most of what is written, and books at the GB Store are not worth the cost of the paper. But you never know when something just seems "right" or fits a certain fellow like a tailored suit. And unless folks do write about sports investing, many pundits may miss out on the simplest things that just may seem to make sense, albeit just to them.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

This is oh, so true.

The best books are the ones that don't give specific methods, but encourage new ways of thinking about handicapping.

That being said, there are some FANTASTIC books on sports betting and gambling. I'd go so far as to say that if you haven't read these books, you aren't winning what you should:

GAMBLING THEORY AND OTHER TOPICS
-- Probably the best book ever written on gambling and math

GETTING THE BEST OF IT
-- More of the same

GAMBLING FOR A LIVING
-- not as good as those above, but still some great ideas.

THE HALF BOOK
-- never read it, only leafed through a friend's copy several times. GREAT STUFF from long Vegas BM Granowski. Appears to be a must read.

HOW PROFESSIONAL GAMBLERS BEAT THE PRO FOOTBALL POINSTPREAD
-- goofy title, by a controversial author but it was one of the few handicapping books that challenged the way I looked at handicapping

Like you said, most of the stuff is junk. Mason Malmuth and David Sklansky are about as good as it gets.

Skylansky talks about stuff like analyzing progressive keno machines which were pretty earth shattering when the book appeared (I think).

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